Combat Stuttering Help Guide

Combat Stuttering Help Guide


Combat Stuttering Help Guide

Does this sound familiar?

• Hey, I stutter and have had therapy many years ago but it didn't seem to help.
• For some reason I really couldn't talk. I'm so embarrassed now.
• I stutter from time to time, usually from nerves. I just write it off as a brain fart and push on talking.
• I find I stutter more if i'm thinking too hard about what to say, or if I censor myself.

What is Stuttering?

Stuttering is a speech disorder which manifests itself in the form of involuntary repetitions, prolongations and blocks during speech. These are often accompanied by facial spasms and body movements in more severe cases. Stuttering often leads to embarrassment, apprehension and fear of loss of speech control.

Stuttering occurs to various degrees in about 1% of adults and about 4% of children (under the age of 12), which means that, eventually, some of the children overcame the disorder. It occurs about four times more often in males than in females. The majority of stutterers can sing and whisper without problems.

Coping with Stuttering and Available Therapies

Coping with stuttering depends on the particular case and the environment in which the person is working and living. Treatment offered by Speech Pathologists involves various techniques to slow down speech, coordinate speech production with breathing, change ways of speaking and pronouncing words etc.

It also involves some counseling and relaxation therapy which very often overlaps with work and input from Psychologists.

These techniques work to a certain degree and results depend very much on the particular case. They tend to work better in a clinical setting than in the real world where a person cannot concentrate as much on speech production. Unfortunately, many of these techniques require a conscious effort on the part of the stutterer.

Many people give up speech therapy because they feel that fluent, but unnatural sounding speech is worse than stuttering itself. It is estimated that about 5% to 10% of stutterers are receiving some form of therapy. The low numbers are an indication of the effectiveness of current treatments!

In this Combat Stuttering help guide, here are some of the things you will discover...

• What developmental stuttering is
• What psychogenic stuttering is
• The three characteristics of stuttering
• Secondary behaviors of stuttering
• Emotional feelings of people who stutter
and more...

Download Now...It's FREE!
To Your Success:)
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About Combat Stuttering Help Guide
Combat Stuttering Help Guide

Does this sound familiar?

• Hey, I stutter and have had therapy many years ago but it didn't seem to help.
• For some reason I really couldn't talk. I'm so embarrassed now.
• I stutter from time to time, usually from nerves. I just write it off as a brain fart and push on talking.
• I find I stutter more if i'm thinking too hard about what to say, or if I censor myself.

What is Stuttering?

Stuttering is a speech disorder which manifests itself in the form of involuntary repetitions, prolongations and blocks during speech. These are often accompanied by facial spasms and body movements in more severe cases. Stuttering often leads to embarrassment, apprehension and fear of loss of speech control.

Stuttering occurs to various degrees in about 1% of adults and about 4% of children (under the age of 12), which means that, eventually, some of the children overcame the disorder. It occurs about four times more often in males than in females. The majority of stutterers can sing and whisper without problems.

Coping with Stuttering and Available Therapies

Coping with stuttering depends on the particular case and the environment in which the person is working and living. Treatment offered by Speech Pathologists involves various techniques to slow down speech, coordinate speech production with breathing, change ways of speaking and pronouncing words etc.

It also involves some counseling and relaxation therapy which very often overlaps with work and input from Psychologists.

These techniques work to a certain degree and results depend very much on the particular case. They tend to work better in a clinical setting than in the real world where a person cannot concentrate as much on speech production. Unfortunately, many of these techniques require a conscious effort on the part of the stutterer.

Many people give up speech therapy because they feel that fluent, but unnatural sounding speech is worse than stuttering itself. It is estimated that about 5% to 10% of stutterers are receiving some form of therapy. The low numbers are an indication of the effectiveness of current treatments!

In this Combat Stuttering help guide, here are some of the things you will discover...

• What developmental stuttering is
• What psychogenic stuttering is
• The three characteristics of stuttering
• Secondary behaviors of stuttering
• Emotional feelings of people who stutter
and more...

Download Now...It's FREE!
To Your Success:)

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