Pug Puzzle Game

Pug Puzzle Game


These pugs have gotten all mixed up. A jumble of fur and wrinkles and noses. Can you unscramble them?

This is a fantastic puzzle game to challenge your mind while enjoying these beautiful animals.

Physical characteristics
While the pugs that are depicted in eighteenth century prints tend to be long and lean, modern breed preferences are for a square cobby body, a compact form, a deep chest, and well-developed muscle. Their smooth and glossy coats can be fawn, apricot fawn, silver fawn, or black. The markings are clearly defined and there is a trace of a black line extending from the occiput to the tail. The tail normally curls tightly over the hip.

Pugs have two distinct shapes for their ears, "rose" and "button". "Rose" ears are smaller than the standard style of "button" ears, and are folded with the front edge against the side of the head. Breeding preference goes to "button" style ears.

Pugs' legs are very strong, straight, of moderate length, and are set well under. Their shoulders are moderately laid back. Their ankles are strong, their feet are small, their toes are well split-up, and their nails are black. The lower teeth normally protrude further than their upper, resulting in an under-bite.

Temperament
The breed is often described as multum in parvo, or "much in little", alluding to the pug's remarkable personality, despite its small size. Pugs are strong willed but rarely aggressive, and are suitable for families with children. The majority of the breed is very fond of children and sturdy enough to properly play with them. Depending on their owner's mood, they can be quiet and docile but also vivacious and teasing.

The breed has strong, straight legs set well under the body and a tail that curls over the hip

Chinese origins
Although the early history of the pug is not attested to in detail, it is accepted that modern pugs are descended from dogs imported to Europe from China in the 6th century. Similar dogs were popular in the Imperial court during the Song Dynasty.

The breed eventually became popular in other European countries as well. Pugs were painted by Goya in Spain, and in Italy they rode up front on private carriages, dressed in jackets and pantaloons that matched those of the coachman. They were used by the military to track animals and people, and were also employed as guard dogs.

18th century to present day
The English painter William Hogarth was the devoted owner of a series of pugs. His 1745 self-portrait, which is now in London's Tate Gallery, includes his pug, Trump. The pug was also well known in Italy. In 1779, a Mrs. Piozzi wrote in her journal, "The little pug dog or Dutch mastiff has quitted London for Padua, I perceive. Every carriage I meet here has a pug in it." The popularity of the pug continued to spread in France during the eighteenth century. Before her marriage to Napoleon Bonaparte, Joséphine had her pug Fortune carry concealed messages to her family while she was confined at Les Carmes prison, it having alone been given visiting rights.

In nineteenth century England, the breed flourished under the patronage of Queen Victoria. Her many pugs, which she bred herself, included Olga, Pedro, Minka, Fatima and Venus. Her involvement with dogs in general helped to establish the Kennel Club, which was formed in 73. Queen Victoria favoured apricot and fawn colors. Queen Victoria's passion for pugs was passed on to many other members of the Royal family, including her grandson King George V[] and his son King Edward VIII. In paintings and engravings of the th and 9th centuries, pugs usually appear with longer legs and noses than today, and with cropped ears. The modern pug's appearance probably changed after 60 when a new wave of pugs were imported directly from China. These pugs had shorter legs and the modern-style pug nose. The British aristocrat Lady Brassey is credited with making black pugs fashionable after she brought some back from China in 6.

Recent changes:
o More pictures!
o Puzzles in a random order.
o Improved design! New grey background.
o Pressing the back button allows you to quit the game.
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Free
70
3.5
User ratings
2
Installs
50+
Concerns
0
File size
12532 kb
Screenshots
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About Pug Puzzle Game
These pugs have gotten all mixed up. A jumble of fur and wrinkles and noses. Can you unscramble them?

This is a fantastic puzzle game to challenge your mind while enjoying these beautiful animals.

Physical characteristics
While the pugs that are depicted in eighteenth century prints tend to be long and lean, modern breed preferences are for a square cobby body, a compact form, a deep chest, and well-developed muscle. Their smooth and glossy coats can be fawn, apricot fawn, silver fawn, or black. The markings are clearly defined and there is a trace of a black line extending from the occiput to the tail. The tail normally curls tightly over the hip.

Pugs have two distinct shapes for their ears, "rose" and "button". "Rose" ears are smaller than the standard style of "button" ears, and are folded with the front edge against the side of the head. Breeding preference goes to "button" style ears.

Pugs' legs are very strong, straight, of moderate length, and are set well under. Their shoulders are moderately laid back. Their ankles are strong, their feet are small, their toes are well split-up, and their nails are black. The lower teeth normally protrude further than their upper, resulting in an under-bite.

Temperament
The breed is often described as multum in parvo, or "much in little", alluding to the pug's remarkable personality, despite its small size. Pugs are strong willed but rarely aggressive, and are suitable for families with children. The majority of the breed is very fond of children and sturdy enough to properly play with them. Depending on their owner's mood, they can be quiet and docile but also vivacious and teasing.

The breed has strong, straight legs set well under the body and a tail that curls over the hip

Chinese origins
Although the early history of the pug is not attested to in detail, it is accepted that modern pugs are descended from dogs imported to Europe from China in the 6th century. Similar dogs were popular in the Imperial court during the Song Dynasty.

The breed eventually became popular in other European countries as well. Pugs were painted by Goya in Spain, and in Italy they rode up front on private carriages, dressed in jackets and pantaloons that matched those of the coachman. They were used by the military to track animals and people, and were also employed as guard dogs.

18th century to present day
The English painter William Hogarth was the devoted owner of a series of pugs. His 1745 self-portrait, which is now in London's Tate Gallery, includes his pug, Trump. The pug was also well known in Italy. In 1779, a Mrs. Piozzi wrote in her journal, "The little pug dog or Dutch mastiff has quitted London for Padua, I perceive. Every carriage I meet here has a pug in it." The popularity of the pug continued to spread in France during the eighteenth century. Before her marriage to Napoleon Bonaparte, Joséphine had her pug Fortune carry concealed messages to her family while she was confined at Les Carmes prison, it having alone been given visiting rights.

In nineteenth century England, the breed flourished under the patronage of Queen Victoria. Her many pugs, which she bred herself, included Olga, Pedro, Minka, Fatima and Venus. Her involvement with dogs in general helped to establish the Kennel Club, which was formed in 73. Queen Victoria favoured apricot and fawn colors. Queen Victoria's passion for pugs was passed on to many other members of the Royal family, including her grandson King George V[] and his son King Edward VIII. In paintings and engravings of the th and 9th centuries, pugs usually appear with longer legs and noses than today, and with cropped ears. The modern pug's appearance probably changed after 60 when a new wave of pugs were imported directly from China. These pugs had shorter legs and the modern-style pug nose. The British aristocrat Lady Brassey is credited with making black pugs fashionable after she brought some back from China in 6.

Recent changes:
o More pictures!
o Puzzles in a random order.
o Improved design! New grey background.
o Pressing the back button allows you to quit the game.
User reviews of Pug Puzzle Game
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Android Market Comments
A Google User
Jun 28, 2014
Fun and quick Love pugs. Perfect time waster!