CrossMe Nonograms

CrossMe Nonograms


CrossMe is a fun and challenging nonograms with a nice interface and easy controls. You will discover a hidden picture by filling in cells on a game field. With a large number of nonograms, you won’t let you get bored!


The first levels have hints for beginners, while more experienced nonogram players can find more challenging, larger nonograms. It’s easy to learn how to play the game, but you will need logical and analytical skills.


"Simple and awesome! It's the game I looking for, it's lightweight, simple, addicting."

"Love this game. Great controls. Keeps me from having to buy so many nonogram magazines and books...and pens!"

"Awesome game! I love this game...some of the nonograms are hard to figure out..but that makes it a challenge!"

"Very addictive. I play every chance I get."

"Great! If you want to challenge your self, then this is the app for you!! A very good way to keep your brain busy!"


Features:
- More than 800 noongrams (24 free)
- 8 levels and sizes, ranging from 5х5 to 60х60
- Easy controls
- Ancient Japanese design
- Hints
- Syncing between devices

New permissions are used by video ads.

In japanese nonograms the numbers are a form of discrete tomography that measures how many unbroken lines of filled-in squares there are in any given row or column. For example, a clue of "4 8 3" would mean there are sets of four, eight, and three filled squares, in that order, with at least one blank square between successive groups. To solve Japanese nonogram, one needs to determine which squares will be filled and which will be empty.
These nonograms are often black and white, describing a binary image, but they can also be colored. If colored, the number clues are also colored to indicate the color of the squares. In such crossword two differently colored numbers may have a space in between them. For example, a black four followed by a red two could mean four black boxes, some empty spaces, and two red boxes, or it could simply mean four black boxes followed immediately by two red ones.


Japanese crosswords, also known as nonogram, hanjie, griddlers, picross, crucipixel, edel, figurepic, grafilogika, japanilaiset, karala!, kare, logicolor, logigraphe, oekaki, oekaki-mate, pic-a-pix, pikurosu, ristikot, shchor, square, tsunami, uftor or paint by numbers puzzles, started appearing in Japanese puzzle magazines. Non Ishida published three picture grid puzzles in 1988 in Japan under the name of "Window Art Puzzles". Subsequently in 1990, James Dalgety in the UK invented the name Nonograms after Non Ishida, and The Sunday Telegraph started publishing them on a weekly basis.

Griddlers were implemented by 1995 on hand held electronic toys in Japan. They were released with name Picross - Picture Crossword.
Hanjie has no theoretical limit on size, and is not restricted to square layouts.

Recent changes:
New puzzles
Bug fixes
Add to list
Free
83
4.2
User ratings
33099
Installs
1,000,000+
Concerns
0
File size
19541 kb
Screenshots
Video of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms Screenshot of CrossMe Nonograms
About CrossMe Nonograms
CrossMe is a fun and challenging nonograms with a nice interface and easy controls. You will discover a hidden picture by filling in cells on a game field. With a large number of nonograms, you won’t let you get bored!


The first levels have hints for beginners, while more experienced nonogram players can find more challenging, larger nonograms. It’s easy to learn how to play the game, but you will need logical and analytical skills.


"Simple and awesome! It's the game I looking for, it's lightweight, simple, addicting."

"Love this game. Great controls. Keeps me from having to buy so many nonogram magazines and books...and pens!"

"Awesome game! I love this game...some of the nonograms are hard to figure out..but that makes it a challenge!"

"Very addictive. I play every chance I get."

"Great! If you want to challenge your self, then this is the app for you!! A very good way to keep your brain busy!"


Features:
- More than 800 noongrams (24 free)
- 8 levels and sizes, ranging from 5х5 to 60х60
- Easy controls
- Ancient Japanese design
- Hints
- Syncing between devices

New permissions are used by video ads.

In japanese nonograms the numbers are a form of discrete tomography that measures how many unbroken lines of filled-in squares there are in any given row or column. For example, a clue of "4 8 3" would mean there are sets of four, eight, and three filled squares, in that order, with at least one blank square between successive groups. To solve Japanese nonogram, one needs to determine which squares will be filled and which will be empty.
These nonograms are often black and white, describing a binary image, but they can also be colored. If colored, the number clues are also colored to indicate the color of the squares. In such crossword two differently colored numbers may have a space in between them. For example, a black four followed by a red two could mean four black boxes, some empty spaces, and two red boxes, or it could simply mean four black boxes followed immediately by two red ones.


Japanese crosswords, also known as nonogram, hanjie, griddlers, picross, crucipixel, edel, figurepic, grafilogika, japanilaiset, karala!, kare, logicolor, logigraphe, oekaki, oekaki-mate, pic-a-pix, pikurosu, ristikot, shchor, square, tsunami, uftor or paint by numbers puzzles, started appearing in Japanese puzzle magazines. Non Ishida published three picture grid puzzles in 1988 in Japan under the name of "Window Art Puzzles". Subsequently in 1990, James Dalgety in the UK invented the name Nonograms after Non Ishida, and The Sunday Telegraph started publishing them on a weekly basis.

Griddlers were implemented by 1995 on hand held electronic toys in Japan. They were released with name Picross - Picture Crossword.
Hanjie has no theoretical limit on size, and is not restricted to square layouts.

Recent changes:
New puzzles
Bug fixes

Android Market Comments
A Google User
6 days ago
Better than sudoku Just as challenging and you have a picture at the end of the puzzle...only thing I bought so far in the store to unlock all the puzzles
A Google User
Aug 23, 2015
If you like puzzles... This is the only paid app I use, and I love it. If you enjoy the free levels, then the paid ones are worth every penny. You get hundreds of more levels. Challenging, fun, and LOTS of levels to play.
A Google User
Aug 21, 2015
One of the best app purchases I ever made This app has kept me entertained for years. Very pleased with it. I just wish I could fill in two-dimensional areas in one stroke instead of having to draw one row at a time.
A Google User
Aug 19, 2015
Worth the $4.99 Good game that actually does IAP the right way. You get a good feel for the game for free and if you enjoy it then the price is set at an appropriate amount.
A Google User
Aug 15, 2015
Live this game Would gain an extra star if it didn't suck data and battery. It used to never be this bad, and I've been playing this game forever.